Weekly Roundup: September 26

pietro mellini

  • Quadrigam, a tool to “create & publish data driven websites” (via Miriam Posner)

Weekly Roundup: January 31

Kate&HerHorns

  • Michelle Moravec’s Pinterest board on Historian Altmetrics, showing her work “digitally reassess[ing] the influence of activists in the 1970s who, while important to the development of feminist theory, may not have produced much by the way written work that is now cited” (from Beyond Citations, from Moravec’s The Politics of Women’s Culture, a fascinating project in which she posts her work/writing-in-progress for public comment.)

Digital History & AHA 2015

Far from being in New York for this year’s AHA conference, I was visiting family in Texas. Nonetheless, two things were fairly clear from roughly 1800 miles away: digital history projects were getting some attention, and conference attendees were, thankfully, tweeting conference away.

As a side note to the rest of this post, I want to thank everyone who tweeted from AHA and from every conference. Not only is it a great tool for those attending conferences, but it is a great resource for the rest of us who are  unable for one reason or another to attend a given conference. In fact, I probably could not write this post if it were not for the AHA attendees who tweeted panels, projects, papers, thoughts, questions, and answers.

To begin, let’s just look at the panels that were exclusively (based on the online program) on digital history:

And needless to say, there were digital projects and methods presented on panels that were not exclusively on digital history. But we can’t stop there those who presented at the Digital Projects Lightning Round. You can see a complete list of the projects with short descriptions here – with the added bonus that the projects are linked to their respected websites.

In addition to the AHA’s list of participants, check out Anelise H. Shrout’s list on of Digital Projects at the AHA on her blog, especially since she includes projects from the associated THATCamp as well.

Finally, you can attend, as it were, the Getting Started in Digital History Workshop via Jason M. Kelly’s blog.

Coming soon: posts on mapping and teaching from AHA and other sources!