Weekly Roundup: September 6

Just a quick post due to the holiday weekend. In honor of Labor Day tomorrow in the US, I wanted to repost “Tools for Digital Labor History,” a concise intro useful to all historians, compiled by Toby Higbie for the Laboring Big Data panel at LAWCHA (Labor and Working Class History Association) 2015.

I also want to take a moment to revisit the Digital Labor conference from last year, at the New School. Select videos from the proceedings can be found via this youtube playlist.

And, considering that it is the beginning of a new semester, check out “How Not To Teach the Digital Humanities” by Ryan Cordell, and “5 Reasons Why Jekyll + github is a Terrible Teaching Tool” by Vince Knight.

 

 

Weekly Roundup: August 27

Schomburg Emmet Till

  • This iPhone app, BibUp, from the University of Fribourg, that allows you capture citations via ISBN or barcode, as well as take pics, that can later be downloaded into Zotero. University of Fribourg users have the further advantage of an OCR feature.

Weekly Roundup: June 8

Genius

  • Global Perspectives on Digital History, a site that collects material from “hundreds of venues where high-quality scholarship is likely to appear, including the personal websites of scholars, institutional sites, blogs, and other feeds” including Twitter.
  •  Finally, I’m soliciting resources on GIS – these may be books, websites, blogs, videos, anything. To begin, a friend recommended I check out the GIS subreddit. What else is out there?

Weekly Roundup: March 28

Dirt Directory

Digital History & AHA 2015

Far from being in New York for this year’s AHA conference, I was visiting family in Texas. Nonetheless, two things were fairly clear from roughly 1800 miles away: digital history projects were getting some attention, and conference attendees were, thankfully, tweeting conference away.

As a side note to the rest of this post, I want to thank everyone who tweeted from AHA and from every conference. Not only is it a great tool for those attending conferences, but it is a great resource for the rest of us who are  unable for one reason or another to attend a given conference. In fact, I probably could not write this post if it were not for the AHA attendees who tweeted panels, projects, papers, thoughts, questions, and answers.

To begin, let’s just look at the panels that were exclusively (based on the online program) on digital history:

And needless to say, there were digital projects and methods presented on panels that were not exclusively on digital history. But we can’t stop there those who presented at the Digital Projects Lightning Round. You can see a complete list of the projects with short descriptions here – with the added bonus that the projects are linked to their respected websites.

In addition to the AHA’s list of participants, check out Anelise H. Shrout’s list on of Digital Projects at the AHA on her blog, especially since she includes projects from the associated THATCamp as well.

Finally, you can attend, as it were, the Getting Started in Digital History Workshop via Jason M. Kelly’s blog.

Coming soon: posts on mapping and teaching from AHA and other sources!

Digital Tools in the Classroom

TimelineJS

  • http://timeline.knightlab.com/

    A colleague included an assignment using Timeline JS in her urban history class this past semester and said it was a great success. Basically, Timeline creates web-based timeline presentations into which you can easily embed links, YouTube clips, images, and so on. It’s intuitive, and the main page includes a number of examples created by Time, Le Monde, and other news outlets.

voyant-see

  • http://voyant-tools.org/

    A text-analysis tool into which you can cut and paste text, or provide a website URL. Voyant will provide word counts, word frequency, contextual information, and visualization tools (word clouds, graphs, etc.) that you can download or share online. I’ve heard that you can enter, say, five Jane Austen novels or the collected works of Thoreau, and while it goes slowly, it will still work with that amount of text. One suggested use I’ve heard for a history class is analyzing the language in the United States’ Declaration of Independence and the France’s Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen.