Syllabi et cetera.

The below list is more the beginning of a reference list for anyone who is getting ready to teach a digital history course for the first time (a category that includes me, for example). You’ll find digital history syllabi and course website, though I intend to include eventually digital humanities courses that could easily lend themselves to the history classroom. At the end you’ll find a few resources on digital pedagogy in general. This list is not comprehensive, and the emphasis is material oriented towards beginners. Also, this list does not distinguish between physical classrooms and digital classrooms. Enjoy!

Syllabi

Introduction to Digital Humanities course by Amardeep Singh and Ed Whitley at Lehigh University.

Death // in the digital age by Annelise Shrout at Davidson College

General Resources

10 Things the Best Digital Teachers Do by Jesse Stommel at University of Wisconsin-Madison

Teaching with Twitter by Christopher Haynes at University of Colorado

How Not to Teach Digital Humanities by Ryan Cordell at Northeastern University

 

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Weekly Roundup: September 26

pietro mellini

  • Quadrigam, a tool to “create & publish data driven websites” (via Miriam Posner)

Weekly Roundup: September 6

Just a quick post due to the holiday weekend. In honor of Labor Day tomorrow in the US, I wanted to repost “Tools for Digital Labor History,” a concise intro useful to all historians, compiled by Toby Higbie for the Laboring Big Data panel at LAWCHA (Labor and Working Class History Association) 2015.

I also want to take a moment to revisit the Digital Labor conference from last year, at the New School. Select videos from the proceedings can be found via this youtube playlist.

And, considering that it is the beginning of a new semester, check out “How Not To Teach the Digital Humanities” by Ryan Cordell, and “5 Reasons Why Jekyll + github is a Terrible Teaching Tool” by Vince Knight.

 

 

Weekly Roundup: March 28

Dirt Directory

Weekly Roundup: February 21

Queer Relationships

  • “We must always remember who’s behind the screen. We must recognize that the text, audio, and video we engage with online are not artifacts. They are people, parts of people who are really, truly sitting behind those many invisible screens. They are people — laughing, crying, cursing people — who we affect every time we engage with digital media. As digital educators, we must vow to never become Clippy. We must remember the people, even when shrouded in anonymity, even when blind peer-reviewing, even when we encounter trolls.”

This piece by Adam Heidebrink-Bruno on connecting with students across digital/online platforms: Clippy’s Ghost: Teaching from the Margins.

  • HathiTrust Research Center UnCamp, March 30-31, at the University of Michigan: “HTRC is hosting its third annual HTRC UnCamp in March 2015 at the University of Michigan. The UnCamp is part hands-on coding and demonstration, part inspirational use-cases, part community building, and a part informational, all structured in the dynamic setting of an un-conference programming format. It has visionary speakers mixed with boot-camp activities and hands-on sessions with HTRC infrastructure and tools.”

(More about the HathiTrust here)

Weekly Roundup: February 8

StJohnIndustrialCity

Digital History & AHA 2015

Far from being in New York for this year’s AHA conference, I was visiting family in Texas. Nonetheless, two things were fairly clear from roughly 1800 miles away: digital history projects were getting some attention, and conference attendees were, thankfully, tweeting conference away.

As a side note to the rest of this post, I want to thank everyone who tweeted from AHA and from every conference. Not only is it a great tool for those attending conferences, but it is a great resource for the rest of us who are  unable for one reason or another to attend a given conference. In fact, I probably could not write this post if it were not for the AHA attendees who tweeted panels, projects, papers, thoughts, questions, and answers.

To begin, let’s just look at the panels that were exclusively (based on the online program) on digital history:

And needless to say, there were digital projects and methods presented on panels that were not exclusively on digital history. But we can’t stop there those who presented at the Digital Projects Lightning Round. You can see a complete list of the projects with short descriptions here – with the added bonus that the projects are linked to their respected websites.

In addition to the AHA’s list of participants, check out Anelise H. Shrout’s list on of Digital Projects at the AHA on her blog, especially since she includes projects from the associated THATCamp as well.

Finally, you can attend, as it were, the Getting Started in Digital History Workshop via Jason M. Kelly’s blog.

Coming soon: posts on mapping and teaching from AHA and other sources!