Digital History & AHA 2015

Far from being in New York for this year’s AHA conference, I was visiting family in Texas. Nonetheless, two things were fairly clear from roughly 1800 miles away: digital history projects were getting some attention, and conference attendees were, thankfully, tweeting conference away.

As a side note to the rest of this post, I want to thank everyone who tweeted from AHA and from every conference. Not only is it a great tool for those attending conferences, but it is a great resource for the rest of us who are  unable for one reason or another to attend a given conference. In fact, I probably could not write this post if it were not for the AHA attendees who tweeted panels, projects, papers, thoughts, questions, and answers.

To begin, let’s just look at the panels that were exclusively (based on the online program) on digital history:

And needless to say, there were digital projects and methods presented on panels that were not exclusively on digital history. But we can’t stop there those who presented at the Digital Projects Lightning Round. You can see a complete list of the projects with short descriptions here – with the added bonus that the projects are linked to their respected websites.

In addition to the AHA’s list of participants, check out Anelise H. Shrout’s list on of Digital Projects at the AHA on her blog, especially since she includes projects from the associated THATCamp as well.

Finally, you can attend, as it were, the Getting Started in Digital History Workshop via Jason M. Kelly’s blog.

Coming soon: posts on mapping and teaching from AHA and other sources!

Weekly Roundup: December 20

  • “History and astronomy are a lot alike. When people claim history couldn’t possibly be scientific, because how can you do science without direct experimentation, astronomy should be used as an immediate counterexample.”

From Digital History, Saturn’s Rings, and the Battle of Trafalgar, from scottbot.net

  • “Over the years, the digital revolution has changed how oral historians conceptualize projects, how they deal with ethical issues, how they process their materials, how they think about sound and video, and how materials are made accessible. All of this has placed oral history squarely in the middle of the conversation about digital humanities.”

Last, but not least (because I’m excited to get my hands on a copy) is Oral History and Digital Humanites: Voice, Access, and Engagement, edited by Douglas A. Boyd and Mary A. Larson, from Palgrave Macmillan,

 oral history and digital humanities

Notes

Two quick notes. First, the Digital Labor conference at the New School is this weekend and will be live streaming. For anyone else interested in the intersection of digital and labor studies, also check out the Digital Labor Working Group at CUNY.

Second, for anyone attending the AHA 2015 Conference, there is a list up on digital history sessions.

Though I’ll be finishing my comprehensive exams in the coming weeks, I plan to write up soon some reflections on the recent meeting of the Social Science History Association in Toronto and digital history.